Becoming a Mediator

There are three general ways to become a paid mediator:

  1. Take a 40-hour general, civil or family mediation training and use your background in some area to attract clients as a private practitioner.
  2. Become a mediator at your workplace or run a volunteer mediation center.
  3. Get a bachelor's or master's degree in dispute resolution and get a job in business or government.

At present, there is no licensing of mediators and no system of national certification. Some states or county courts have requirements for mediators who receive referrals from the courts. If you have any questions regarding certification requirements in your area, contact your nearest state or municipal court.

In addition, the Association for Conflict Resolution sets standards for mediators and is the only national organization to do so. Our basic Divorce and Custody training meets 40 of the 60-hour training requirement for Advanced Practitioner Membership in the Family Section of the Association for Conflict Resolution.

There are also many opportunities to volunteer as a mediator, both in volunteer mediation centers and in the courts. Volunteering is a great way to get experience as a mediator.

…my feelings about the mediation process changed significantly, opening my mind to a new way of bringing people with adverse positions together…. I encourage all family law practitioners to spend one week of their careers for training in…
– Hon. Bill Callahan, 3rd Judicial Court of Michigan

Great person, knowledgeable trainer, talented mediator.
– Ann Arbor, Mich.